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. >> with more and more shoppers seeking out handcrafted and traditional gifts, germany's famous christmas markets struggled to keep up with the demand. tens of thousands of egyptians are out protesting against president morsi at this hour after an islamist-led assembly raced through the approval of a new constitution, a move to end the crisis. >> the document is based on sharia law. critics say it ignores fundamental democratic principles and marginalizes the nation's large christian populations. it has set the stage for conflict in a more increasingly divided nation. >> opponents of the president are outraged at the document adopted by the assembly. protesters are maintaining a vigil, and demonstrations are growing. critics warn that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assembly have already answered that question -- the body signed off on all 234 articles of the constitution, wh
in europe -- but greece -- puts greece as the most corrupt country in europe. >> germany is mulling over whether to try to outlaw a far- right party accused of stirring up anti-immigrant sentiment. minister >> to go formal step toward banning the national democratic party, -- ministers took a formal step toward banning the national democratic party, the npd. some worry that prohibiting the party could backfire. it could drum up sympathy for the far right. >> the ministers are united in their call for a ban on meat npd. they reviewed extensive -- on the npd. they reviewed extensive documentation before making up their mind. >> i never would have thought they were so anti-democratic or anti-semitic. or so oriented towards violence and so unconstitutional. we have been discussing a ban for 12 years. now we have a lot of material to go on, much more than ever before. >> the ministers will seek to the government's support for the ban. one federal interior minister said they have a good case, but he admits there are risks. >> the danger is that these proceedings could give new life to a party
granted himself sweeping powers. that prompted some judges to call for an indefinite strike. >> germany is reported to be considering the export of tanks and armored vehicles to saudi arabia, a country which is already -- has already used its weapons to put down a popular uprising in the country neighboring. >> they say that hundreds of boxer armoured patrol vehicles -- should the deal goes through, it would make the government an accomplice to islamist extremists, some said. >> saudi arabia is reportedly looking to purchase several hundred of these boxer armoured patrol vehicles. "der spiegel" magazine says this was discussed last week at a meeting. a government spokesman declined to comment. >> confidentiality protect interest of potential buyers, as well as our relations with such countries. many requests are turned down. even if they are proved, they often do not ultimately lead to a deal. >> the blonde is where -- the bundeswehr currently uses the boxer as a transporter. it could be used to crush popular uprisings. germany's opposition is concerned that the saudi royal family, whic
that germany would continue to support afghanistan even after foreign forces pull out in 2014. after he visited with german soldiers stationed in the north of the country. germany took on one more step toward going green on tuesday. chancellor angela merkel was on hand for the opening of a power line between cities in the very north of the country. >> this is all part of germany's goal to try to modernize its power grid and phase out a clear power by the 2020. still, there is opposition. >> i of the german government has its way, the country will soon abound with new power lines like this one. chancellor angela merkel says it represents a milestone in germany's quest to wean itself off fossil fuels and nuclear power -- a milestone because many power lines must follow. >> this is symbolic of the amount of work we have ahead of us. it is a chance to create enthusiasm for the many projects that still have to be built. >> the challenge is to transport energy from wind farms in the country's northern coast to population centers in the south where wind is less dependable. thousands of new transition
story this hour -- germany investing 10 billion euros to ensure renewable energy is available. >> will the debate be different in america after the new town school massacre. -- newtown school massacre? >> german policymakers say the countries making good progress and plans to phase out nuclear energy and increase its dependence on renewable energy. >> in berlin this morning, they delivered their first assessment of infrastructure changes that will be needed to phase out nuclear power by 2020. >> with federal elections next year, energy is a key policy issue, and the government says 10 billion euros is being invested to keep the country's infrastructure up to date. >> germany's economics minister and environment ministers say they want to work together to complete the country's energy transformation. in the past, they have squabbled about details, but now, they say they are united. >> we are going to reach our goals. environmental protection by phasing of nuclear energy and expanding the use of renewals, ensuring energy security despite turning off eight nuclear plants, and a t
a class action suit against germany in a court in the western city of bonn. >> those claims are related to an air strike ordered by a german officer in northern afghanistan in 2009, which killed 90 civilians. germany had given some compensation to the victims' families without admitting responsibility. >> lawyers representing survivors of the air strike are demanding higher compensation -- more than 3 million euros in total. they complain the settlements arrived at immediately following the attack were too small. as far as the german government is concerned, the case is closed. >> 5000 u.s. dollars was paid in over 90 instances. this money was transferred to an account in afghanistan. the account was specifically designed to compensate these families. >> on september 4, 2009, a u.s. f-15 fighter jets bombed two fuel tankers, killing more than 90 civilians. a german officer called in the air strike based on faulty intelligence. the political repercussions were extensive. the german defense minister at the time was forced to step down for his handling of the affair. >> coming up later in
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
. >> germany's economic performance has been strong, but its future is intricately tied to the future of the euro zone. that will create significant dangers for the chancellor, angela merkel. nick spicer reports from berlin. >> let us gaze and peer as best we can into the crystal ball of angela merkel's year ahead. as the euro crisis swarlede -- about her, she emerged as perhaps the world's most powerful woman and certainly germany's most popular politician. but 2013 could well be a year of living dangerously for her. they rallied the troops in september. >> we've kept our promise. through our leadership, germany has emerged stronger from the euro crisis than when it entered it. >> merkel repeated, mantra-like, her tough stance on bailouts and the need for belt tightening. but the problem is that even coming in fishs in the elections won't be enough. >> she has a very unstable combination, and in the german political system it's impossible to just dominate everything with one party so she needs a coalition partner and her current one which she would consider to be her favorite coalit
. >> absolutely. the message is also very clear. we are here because we follow policies dictated by germany. therefore, italy should come out of the straight jacket. this is the message that berlusconi is sending to italians and actually, i think, it's a message that he will use for our campaigns. >> how much support will he get if he's at 15% right now in the polls 12347. >> my concern is that he could actually create some allians with other -- with the populist leaders. there is a lot of discontent and it's quite easy to capture the discontent. it would provide a majority for ruining the country, for governing the country, but it will not enough to destabilize the debate. they say the p.w. trust say that 30% now say the euro has been a good thing in italy. i don't know whether you back that sort of trust. >> oolt r it's how you present it. there is a clear fact that going down economically for a long time. it hasn't had good growth in more than a decade. so more now are in the face in malaise. at the moment, we don't see that. >> what do you take for investors? >> we've already had issues
invaded germany in 1941 and a font back against the germans and they kept going to berlin. c-span: defines stalinism. >> guest: stalinism was a developed system as i say in it was a system of complete control. the stalinist state believed he could control everything. he could control not only politics and not only economics but it could control social life and it could control civic life. it could control sports clubs and chess clubs. in the stalinist system, there were no independent institutions of any kind and no independent voices of any kind were allowed to speak. all the economy was under state control and all of society was. and there was a cultural aspect. the arts were under stalinist control and there was also it cult of stalin's portraits that hung everywhere. all of society was organized around his name and his image. c-span: i grew up in a small town in indiana and one of the main streets in my neighborhood was chris's street. it's not the way you pronounce it but you talk about radio causes in here. we never knew what causes was. >> guest: he was a hungarian hero of 1948, of
warned of a possible recession in germany. central bank cutting its growth forecast for the eurozone's biggest economy and that expects growth to reach just 0.4% in 2013. a big cut from previous forecasts of 1% and 1.6%. there's also no political crisis in italy by the way. support has been withdrawn for the group run by monti. berlusconi hinted he may return to politics after stepping down last year. claudia joins us in milan. a number of reports suggested this may not upset investors too much just because we were going to have elections anyway, it doesn't bring it forward a lot earlier. is that the sense that you're getting? >> yes, it doesn't really change in terms of the timing. it just gives you an idea, though, of where berlusconi stands and what the situation is like within that central right next. the pdl has made it clear that there is a serious disagreement within the party. they were set to go forward with some primaries which is what the center left did to elect their candidate. and now that berlusconi has abruptly announced that he's going back, that tells you there is a
markets incidentally, too. bond markets, the fixed income markets, here we're seeing buying in germany at the moment and 10-year german bund around 3%. a little bit of buying into the gild as well as some of the safe haven trades back on. we have this italian bond auction. the first one is going to be settled in 2013 and the last one in this year, as well. it's thought that it is going to see solid demand given that it hasn't gotten any trouble getting off the ground as of late with those bond auctions, as well. a quick wrap on the forex market. here you're looking at selling in the euro/dollar right now. 1.3190. we're flirting with the high level of this trading range that we've been stuck in. dollar/yen, it's thought when this new japanese government coming into place, they're simulating the economy and to make sure a weaker yen is in place, as well. kelly. >> louisa, thanks. we're keeping an eye on gold today. could the precious metal be losing its luster come 2013? we'll find out why kuts has decided to cut exposure to the precious metal for the first time. >>> hello, everybody. we
germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day and probably all night. we are very much family dependent to achieve as much as we can in the summit. i hope that we will be able to have another commitment perido -- period under the kyoto protocol. i hope as wel
to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sw
with the british army against nazi germany. he took part in the allied invasion of normandy, a bloody battle that claimed thousands of lives. then he, you know, left ireland to go fight in the war because he just got married. he wanted to make a difference. he still had a wife and seven children. grandchildren as he got older. just what you would want to be as a man, i suppose. >> he wants justice for his grandfather, but time is running out. philip is over 90 years old. he never shows off his medals for bravery. even today, nearly 70 years later, he is afraid of the irish authorities. he deserted the irish army to fight for the british, and he was sent to prison when he returned. the trauma has remained with him. this is the first time his family has let anyone film him. strangers and even more so a video camera make him nervous. >> he is still nervous at this ste. i would want to see an apology, maybe, a thank you, a pardon for the paranoia he has gone through, the suffering wondering if a knock on the door means you get punished again and again. >> patrick started a petition to pardon the
to get the latest results from germany's survey any second now. in the meantime, i can can bring you news. for example, on industrial orders and sales in italy, orders flat on the month, down .2 on the month for sales and down nearly 5% on the year. so confirming some of the weakness that we know we've seen previously in the italian economy. meanwhile, another gauge perhaps for the euro as we look to the strength of it lately. that's the current counselor plus which in october was an adjusted 3.9 billion euros, up quite a bit from the 2.5 billion reported for september. now that also comes after -- a day after the european union's report suggesting that in fact the european union would have to run a surplus, given its poor demographics over the next couple of years. now let's get a quick preview of the news. for that we head to patricia, awaiting the results. what do we expect to see? >> reporter: we're expecting the second consecutive month to the upside for the business sentiment next year in germany. november was a surprise after six months to the downside. we expect december to book i
. an agreement still seems pretty elusive at this moment. germany and french finance ministers have very different views about oversight of banks. and in britain, the chancellor george osbourne delivers his statement to parliament today. will be out in westminster soon. steve is out to give us more detailed analysis of what to expect. let's just go back to the eurozone. as you say, thin advances here. are we capping -- it's up against the yen as well. there's obviously been a big yen story. >> yeah, i think the euro/yen has had perhaps more to do with eu euro/dollar than anything else. the euro crosses in general have been story rather than euro/dollar and euro/yen at the forefront. i think the euro/yen forecast is overplayed in what japan will ultimately deliver on. but mum is pretty good. i think you still play for a little yen weakness. i think we'll see a lot of people trying to buy yen back because i don't think we'll get delivery in all these preelection promises. >> do we all think we know what the chancellor is going to say? >> judging by the many pages being given to it in the n
this crisis very well. germany, for example, is doing much better than the united states. the employment has shrunk to the last few years. basically cause the entire crisis. we began at about 5%. we went up to 10% in vietnam at eight and a half%. does not a recovery at all. the germans a doing well. they have one of the best safety nets in europe. there provision of services for other people has not been icons of their having a hard time. the other parts of europe that are doing quite nicely as scandinavia. famous for the quality and quantity of their safety. the idea that european problems because they have the sickened at requires you not to know much . the store. having said that, the crisis is very real in your, and i would urge all of you to pay attention because europe is a very, very important player in the world. in many ways the number one player. but if you take that european market together more people and more product. that is a very important part of the world economy, as important as the american states. also the place in the world that has had more violent warfare among dismem
and finance merging, finance taking over industry, which was what pretty well happened in germany. this was never the case. the united states had a very, very broad financial ostentation . the decentered financial system and one in which financial markets therefore broaden the but not linked directly to particular industries. in their function became that of developing financial instruments which will allow finance to go into the market as individual firms and issue commercial paper to raise their money rather than getting it to wrigley from lynx to particular financiers. that led eventually to the world emulating the rest of the markets. the german banks which were so closely integrated into their industry. deutsche bank is not in distinguishable from goldman. and it explicitly said is a began to shift toward becoming an investment bank along the lines of wall street's, we would be engaging conflict of interest if we are writing ipos for firms that now we are deeply integrated with. they end up owning almost all the mortgages in black cleveland at the time of the 2000 crash. deut
the soviet troupes out of eastern europe. going to let nato take over germany. unite germany and nato can have their germany as long as nato doesn't go further. these kinds of things are in the air. what does bush do? tianimen square happens, he suspended relations, but behind the scenes does business as usual with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in,
investors. tens of thousands of them have made cypress their second home. in germany's federal intelligence service, a to says most of their accounts contain laundered money. the cypriot government denies that. now the country is hoping newly discovered gas reserves off the coast will help pay back credit from the eu in a relatively short time. the first contract with energy companies have been signed. while billions are being spent to bail out the banks, many indebted families feel they have been abandoned. >> seven months ago, we applied for social welfare relief. we have not had an answer yet. >> antonin solaris as a bit of money driving a taxi. he says the streets are becoming more and more empty. most people do not shop or go out anymore. he sees only occasional demonstrations against austerity measures. he says he wishes he could turn back the clock sometimes. >> i should not have taken out so many loans, and i should have been more careful with my money. i tell youngsters like my son to watch how they spend their money. they are going to have it tough. they have to learn that they ca
hollande did not get everything on his wish list. germany insisted that smaller banks, which make up a large part of its banking system, be overseen by national authorities, and it got its way. >> it is important to have a clear division between banking supervision and monetary policy. >> the supervisor will begin work in march, 2014, and be responsible for banks holding more than 30 billion euros in assets. the deal should ensure european taxpayers no longer have to foot the bill when financial institutions find themselves in trouble. >> i'm very satisfied. contrary to expectations, the 27 finance ministers have managed to save the european council. >> as for the question of who will succeed john graja and kurt as head of the eurozone, that is something members -- jean-claude junkecker as head of the eurozo, that is something members still have to decide. >> is this decision basically admitting that national governments are no longer able to keep their countries' banks in line? >> no. first of all, it is admitting that if you have a common currency, then you actually need to have co
for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening global demand we're seeing out of japan and other areas this morning. but it's not necessarily -- if you look at the details of what this is telling us across the globe, frankly a point to deceleration in activities. >> and maybe the global economy will continue to expand. they will signal that china is co
and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3% or greater. >> if we do it now, w
have no problem in meeting its financial commitments. only germany and the netherlands have this rate. before the upgrade, greece's rating had fallen to selective default, which meant it failed to pay on one or more of its obligations. now it was pushed upward to b minus. this shows that greece can meet its financial commitments. i spoke to the fellow at the peterson institute for international economics. >> i think was s&p is catching up to is the improved political goodwill in the rest of the euro area towards the greek economy. yesterday, greece got 34 billion euros as a quid pro quo for having implemented a long list of reforms and fiscal austerity. s&p as saying, we expect this money to continue to flow from up euro area. nd we expect thre greek government to continue to implement economic reforms in the future. >> does this upgrade change anything for grece in rea ?ce ter >> the greek exit from the euro area is an extremely unlikely event, precisely for the reason s&p outlined -- that the euro area has politically decided to keep greece in the euro area. this is not something th
taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3
, and there are schools in asia and south korea, germany, where the school is all year and germany towns out a lot of pretty neat engineers and, of course, much of asia turns out a lost great technology types and the rest, so they are getting bang for the education buck. your fear is it would not be copied here? >>guest: no. the trouble is, you have other countries. in finland, they focus on only putting the proper people to have the highest success in the classroom or potential for success in the classroom in education schools. so they don't just let anyone in a school education. >>neil: they look at promising students. you could be a late bloomer and get passed up. >>guest: that is possible. but, instead, what they are doing is scrutinizing people prior to getting into the system. what we do in america, unfortunately, according to international studies, we have students who are graduating to become teachers are in the bottom third of their graduating class. so we are putting people in choose rooms that are not equipped with skills. they do not have the ability to handle a classroom. so what we n
there's not much growth to be expected from all europe. you know, obviously core europe like germany will grow with the global economy here. but at the moment, because of the issues in japan and all the issues in the u.s., europe and particularly euro is the one to send out is the strong demand. this is something that european policies and that european companies will need to work with. >> next year, although the eurozone economy is stag nating, we do expect a recovery in the global economy to which europe corporate sector is very well levered. it's that recover in the global back drop which allows margins to rise a little bit in eurozone, gives some type line growth and overall profit growth we think of around 9%. >> standing out in 2013, the biggest uncertainty right now has to do with around the housing market in the united states. some people are increasing their belief that you're going to see growth in the housing market from, you know, previous estimates are like 1.5% to % or even 4%. that is the unknown. because as everybody knows, housing has so many secondary and tertiary e
the war after germany attacks the soviet union in 1941 the united states and the british decided they are going to support the soviet union because it is the key to the chance of surviving the war during the soviets and to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so off guard that they were concerned and the soviets are going to capitulate that but they offer several things and the soviets make several demands and promised the material and have a hard time delivering that in the first couple years but stalin says if you give the airplanes and the other equipment we need we can stay in a war. so that is the sincere effort other people are not quite as sincere and providing that. so the second demand, what they want with the concession that they had gotten from hitler in the 1939 pact, and their main demand was for the second. they were fighting. this is the history of this period the americans and the british troops out most of the work were fighting the not provisions combined and there were fighting to hundred, so they were desperate for the united states to open a second f
in the communist in the anti-fascist movement in the united states after that but during the war after germany attacked the soviet union in 1941, then the united states and the british decide that it's important for the soviet union is to keep the soviets in the war. they were caught so offguard that the british were concerned that the soviets would capitulate at that point that the united states offers several things. the soviets made several demands and they promise matÉriel and they had a hard time delivering that for a number of reasons and for a couple of years. stalin said if you give them airplanes and other equipment we need to stay in the war, the united states tries under the effort of other people who are not quite assistance air in providing that so the second man was they wanted the same territorial concessions they have gotten from hitler in 1939 pact that their main demand was for the second front. they were fighting and the history of this period, the americans and the british throughout most of the war were fighting 10 nazi divisions combined and the soviets alone were fighti
to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell. in 1971, paul volcker was an unknown working for another american. henry kissinger, who you may have heard of. before h
to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have to ask yourself is when cash, equities, credit, government bonds, where do you want to be. and equity in my mind mind is absolutely not. you need good growth numbers to justify the equity markets going up. now, i think there's a lot of investors looking at the yields on ghoechlt bonds or credits and that's motivating them to
when they fund german business and the rest of the eu would like to do it and germany won't. seems like a bit of a sticking point to me. >> there are lots of sticking points. first of all, who is going to be the supervisor. for the eurozone, it would be the ecb. but if the ecb is the one big gorilla on the block sitting there in all the meetings so to speak for 17 country, then all the others even if they have their own voice will be slightly sidelined because there's one big power and all the others are split up. so there was a discussion should there be a eurozone supervisor, that doesn't quite work. do we need a some rice or who works for everybody he, where should that sit. brussels, also lots of question marks. and obviously then we get to the point where all the deposit insurances lie. every country has a different scheme. so i think we're a far cry away from having anything like a european banking union. >> i would tend to agree as ever. thank you for now. we'll catch you a little later. how much of this matters? investors say if we move toward a banking union, you can't have any
, not made in germany, not made in china, not made in the u.s. made in the world. 60% of trading manufacturers is in some -- the import content of exports at rate worldwide was 20% years ago, is 40% now and might be 60% 20 years from now. so it's a totally different world from the one many people have in mind where, you know, your country was producing country which my country was consuming and this was a sort of relationship, hands, export this, import that. in this world, the global value changes. you need to import in order to export and use your competitive advantage. so it's a different pattern and i think this has consequences which most governments have, i think, not yet really realized, which is why we've launched this initiative together with the oecd to sort of measure trading at a value and we will probably be unveiling the first batch of trade in value added numbers mid january. our statistical missions are working extremely hard. these guys won't have a great christmas break, but i think that will look very, very, very difference from what we have today. >> just in t
's a union story that tells something about the rebalancing in the eurozone. potentially germany. we know with the xetera dax up .3%. and almost 30% this year. investors see if the euro project hangs together, it's going to mean renation in germany. that is some wage inflation, some price inflation. the public sector union verde, powerful union, along with some others with its contract up at the end of the year is asking, guys, for a 6.5% pay rise next year. it got about 2.5% for the last couple of years. it is on the public sector side but also an example of what kind of pay hikes we may see flowing through to the german economy. if that helps support spending, despite weak industrial production figures and concern about growth prospects, there may be some rebalancing toward the german consumer taking on more of the heavy lifting across the eurozone. so one to keep an eye on, guys. >> thank you very much. we shouldn't see that as the unions pressuring -- they probably are pressuring for higher wages, but there's been pressure on germany to drive more inflation in germany to help lift the
estate in hong kong, and the optics industry in germany? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> welcome back. if today's market action is any suggestion of what's to come, where do you put your money now? >> where do you put your money in the final five trading days of the year? >> well, i think you want to position yourself for growth, for global growth. the u.s. is slowing, so you wan
surpluses to germany and japan. an astonishing number. 70% of the profits in the country were recycled into europe and japan. the marshall plan is a very small target. i will not bore you with details. when they go to washington, it is not an act of philanthropic on the pentagon -- and at the plant for be on the pentagon fell apart -- it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollar rise, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. a period of immense stability very low inflation. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why is that? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism was sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. well, paul volcker -- been named may ring a bell.
and the year rose own economy. we might not be in worse shape than greece but when you take germany and everybody else and put them in one community we are in worse shape than they are and we get the benefit of the doubt. we are the safe haven and people think that everything is okay because they know that we aren't going to defend because you can print money. when they realize printing is worse than defaulting because the potential for the loss is even greater then we are going to see a big spike in the interest rates and that is when we have our crisis because either the fed allows the rates to go up, and who knows how high they might have to go. let's say 10 percent in order to stop the implosion of the dollar and put an end to inflation. if we have a $20 trillion national debt when that happens that would require us to shell out $2 trillion a year of interest payments. where are we going to get that? that all of the tax. >> you mentioned the creditors. who are the creditors? especially for the united states right now. >> some are other americans who own treasury and large insura
there really divergent from the rest of europe. germany up on the right, a good gain up over 1%, the italian market falls by 1%. silvio berlusconi is back in italian politics proving he still runs his party and withdrawing support from mario monti. this may lead to midterm elections because monti is market friendly you might not end up with a market friendly solution. we thought we'd have elections march/april, there's the prospect it could be a snap election much earlier perhaps in the new year. now the good news is there isn't a huge amount of blowout on the bonds at the short end of the italian markets. the yields are higher but not huge relative to where we've been but on the ten-year italian market you can see we're slightly higher but no great shakes overall. it means the rally in the peripheral bond market we've witnessed in italy and spain has now stalled at this stage. remember we had the auction in spain yesterday and the yields are slightly higher relative to where we've been, they're still relatively depressed. we talk about the problems in europe, i thought it was worth pointing
. germany can affo to bailout greece. nobody can afford to bailout the united states, and i would agree actually th bill archer that i think he understated. if you take the total debt situation, you're talking about just shy of three-quarters of a million dollars for the -- per american family. so you get a cup of coffee from a waitress in the diner, think of loading three-quarters of a million dollars of debt on to her shoulders for what? for what? does nothing to show for. lou: her children and their children that will be paying a large measure of that. great to have you with us. making spirits bright. and after america with one of the ugliest pictures of an american cadaver toe tag to. >> doom and the oven is the into debt. lou: at least some balance here. you know how much are presidenta taxes on our middle-class. >> the bill is passed. lou: the house passes the stem emigration bill. some democrats call it racist and pandering. how is that? and republicans also introduced the achieve act. other republicans taking the lead on emigration reforms? ♪ lou: in "lou dobbs forum" we will
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